Social Isolation

(internet photo)

Today it’s difficult for me to remain optimistic. It’s our granddaughter’s birthday and to add insult to injury, the gift we ordered online to be delivered before this special day, has not yet arrived. I don’t want to have the day pass empty handed from us so I have written her a humble story and illustrated it to the best of my ability. Singing “Happy Birthday” over the phone with her triggered my tears… I guess it’s a small price to pay if we can remain healthy.

I wish everyone strength and fortitude to get through this. May we all remain healthy!

Reading some poetry by Jimmy Pappas, a New Hampshire poet, inspired the following:

Social Isolation

We cannot
tell

if it is time
for

Friday night wine
or

Sunday
prayers.

Let us
bow our heads.

Rest Is In My Breath

One of my favourite things is the scent of fresh laundered sheets with a hint of bleach and outdoor sunshine lingering on the threads. One of my least favourite things to do is crawl out of a cozy bed to a dark, cold morning. Especially since lately I have been having trouble sleeping.

I love to cradle a hot cup of tea between both hands, savoring a rich blend of Chai spices flaring my nostrils. But I hate hot liquid burning my tongue. Often I choose to guzzle the tepid drink later because it sat forgotten beside my computer screen.

This morning I sat in quiet but not stillness. My body didn’t move, I didn’t fidget, and my hands remained relaxed in my lap. But my mind refused to settle. Thoughts galloped behind my eyes. Before the apocalypse many small bookstores struggled. Since social distancing became mainstream, they have gone silent. I hope they will last until after. After. After we are allowed to be close to one another again. After the locks are opened and we can breathe a little easier. After we can go to the dentist, the hair dresser, the post office, linger with a fresh off the press new book in hand.

These thoughts defy the will to rest, to simply be. They demand attention, they want to be seen and heard. So for thirty minutes I do battle. When it’s over I realize I had thirty minutes of tending to passing thoughts. I’m not sure if that would qualify as meditation but it meant thirty minutes without really thinking about Covid-19 and the corona virus. I didn’t solve the issue of what will happen to my beloved independent bookstores, but the distractions and outside “noise” did provide thirty minutes of welcome rest.

Joy

I’m re-posting a photo that was taken at Durand Glacier, British Columbia, a number of years ago and I hope it will bring a smile to your face despite all the swirling uncertainty.

Perhaps we can use this time of social distancing and social isolation to regain an appreciation not just for each other, but for our beautiful earth as well.

I wish good health to all of you who read this post. Be kind to each other.

Finding A Rhythm

personal photo

Today I am sharing with you bits of ideas and hope that I have gleaned from others. I hope these words will also bring a smile to your face and a moment of peace into your life.

I start with a beautiful, illustrated deck of cards from The Faeries Oracle by Brian Froud with text by Jessica MacBeth. There are faces in the trees. Behind an owl, another looks out at me. Sairie, the Faery Godmother, smiles beneath a crown of stars, flowers and branches. Peace and contentment are sent on fairy dust into my home. Everything is shifting, energy is shifting from dreaming to get up and go. “She gives us grace to help us along our way. It might be a little touch of faery dust to lift a mood, it might be a conspicuous miracle, it might be anything in between. She untangles the snarls in our psyches and bestows gifts upon us – whatever she feels we need. Sometimes she gives us choices when we thought we had none.”

From Marie at http://www.notenoughcinnamon.com, a beautiful blog about clean, healthy eating: “Let every hand you didn’t shake be a text-message to a friend who needs company. Every hug you didn’t give, a phone call to a relative who needs comfort.” Social distancing doesn’t have to mean we are all isolated.

When you are able to slow the frenetic pace of this new reality, and move away from the constant bombardment of the daily news, when you start to find a nice rhythm again remember how it feels and use it again tomorrow!

I’m sending virtual hugs to all of you.

Mary

Spring Equinox

internet photo of a Hawthorn tree
Today I am sharing from Sharlyn HiDalgo's "The Healing Power of Trees."  In her book March 21 - April 17 is Hawthorn Month Here is a sample of what she says: "Despite the jubilant celebration of spring's arrival, this month is a time to quiet oneself and go within.  ...it refers to personal sovereignty in which we reclaim our personal power and pay attention to our own inner life.  Fasting, ritual cleansing, and refraining from one's usual habits and patterns is encouraged.  We may want to seek retreat and silence in order to reconnect with the divine and the unseen worlds."  How timely!! 

Topsy Turvy World

We're falling down
the rabbit hole
at warp speed
a toilet paper trail
behind us.

The Cheshire Cat 
would be
welcome
as characters
more ominous
than any from Tenniel
enter our daily lives.

The Horsemen prance
in the shadows -
not since the Spanish flu
have so many visions
danced in their heads.

Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse
Image from the Print Collector/Heritage Images

Coping

Blizzard white streets
line our city
sifted with fear.
Blue skies above
hiding enemy breath
ready to attack 
unsuspecting hosts.
Our homes
once lively and vibrant
withdraw to silent
lemon scent lysol 
war zones.
Ninty per cent alcohol
for our hands
hands that touch and hold
caress and scratch
tap and text.
Our worst foe
bringing havoc 
to the center of our lives.
But people are people.
Evening dusts
computer screens with song.
People reach people
across balconies
across seas
half a world apart
isolated but not alone
people connect.
Puccini's "Nessun Dorma"
soars
"we will be victorious."